Botanical Garden

Sweet husband and I went to a botanical garden last week.  May I say, it was spectacular?!

It is the end of the season, but we still had many types of grasses, moss, trees and bushes (many we had never seen before).  There were several types of flowers still blooming, herbs and vegetables, plus fountains, water falls, ponds, chipmunks and many butterflies.  They had a children’s garden (probably my favorite part) complete with scarecrows, a tree house, an art/reading room, ponds and bridges.

After walking through the formal, vegetable and children’s garden we headed off through the woods to the “natural” setting; you know trails thru the woods, along a lake, with boulders and tree/bush identifying signs, etc.  The canopy housed many birds, more chipmunks and delightfully, beautifully colored leaves drifting to the ground like fairies marking the path before you.  We walked down the trail toward the lake, the leaves were brilliant, the lake was smooth, showing a beautiful reflection of the tree colors on the other side.  It was amazingly peaceful and beautiful/  So much so that I actually didn’t realize I had been walking down into this dark forest for quite a distance…THEN we turned a corner… OMGosh I realized we would be walking BACK UP this looooooooong, winding hill.  There was no one else around us (no one was stupid enough to go on that long trek with rain threatening).  At that point I realized and said to my sweet husband with the appropriate panic in my voice, “If we die here trying to climb this hill, no one will find until the spring!”

About two-thirds of the way up this mountain we crossed a road (I use that word very loosely) and we saw signs pushing us onward across this “road”.  Out of the corner of my eye, a few feet up the “road” I saw a bench and what looked like a laarg golf cart parked by it.  Thank you, Jesus!  I am saved.  Sweet husband kept going up the path because he wanted to see the promised water fall at the end of the trail.  My new best friend drove me the final third of the way back in his wonderful chariot (golf cart).  After my best friend dropped me at the top of the hill, I sent him back to find sweet husband – success.

Lunch and coffee were available at the visitor’s center.  We have been sufficiently strengthened for yet another day and another quest.

The Walk in the woods

from the bottom of the trail

from the bottom of the trail

Across the lake

Sweet Husband's quest

Sweet Husband’s quest

Did you know it changes color in the fall.  In the deep south grass just dies from the heat of August/September.  I have had such a sheltered life.

Did you know it changes color in the fall. In the deep south grass just dies from the heat of August/September. I have had such a sheltered life.

There were several in the Children's garden, but this one was made of ribbon...just lovely

There were several in the Children’s garden, but this one was made of ribbon…just lovely

History With God

We are often told that we cannot base our relationship with God on various significant life experiences and/or miracles. In other words, we cannot live on today what He did for us yesterday. We are told we cannot save yesterday’s “manna”, so to speak, to give us life today. Indeed this is true, however, it is yesterday’s manna that got me to today. My relationship with my Lord isn’t based (alone) on the fact that His mercy is new every morning, but is enhanced by my relationship history with Him.

King David (the man after God’s heart) said (I paraphrase), “I was young and now I am old, but I have never seen the righteous forsaken or their children begging bread.”

Relationship history is every bit as important as the new manna that is given for our growth and survival. It validates in our soul His faithfulness, His love, and the value He places on our lives. And day, upon day it changes our perspective on the world and on ourselves and His faithfulness.

Nova Scotia (Cape Breton Island) Along The Cabot Trail

NECESSARY (and boring) HISTORY:

Nova Scotia (also known as Acadia) is a Canadian province located in Canada’s Maritimes. During the first 150 years of European settlement, the colony was primarily made up of Catholic Acadians (French). This time period involved six wars in which the French and some Acadians resisted the British settling the region.

During this time most of the Acadians were expelled by the English where 2/3 of them died going back to France. The Acadians of South Louisiana came from this area because Louisiana was a French, at that time, colony.

After the colonial wars, New England Planters and Foreign Protestants settled Nova Scotia. After the American Revolution, the colony was settled by Loyalists. During the nineteenth century, Nova Scotia became self-governing in 1848 and joined the Canadian Confederation in 1867.

The colonial history of Nova Scotia includes the present-day Canadian Maritime provinces and northern Maine, all of which were at one time part of Nova Scotia. In 1763 Cape Breton Island (which we visited on this trip) and St. John’s Island (what is now Prince Edward Island – visited in previous post) became part of Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia included present-day New Brunswick (we will post about part of this region in another post to follow) until that province was established in 1784.

Let me say, this place is beyond beautiful.  Please add this to your must see list.

This trail circles this island along the coast.  It is breathtaking around each curve or topping each hill.

This trail circles this island along the coast. It is breathtaking around each curve or topping each hill.

Cabot Trail 1

This is a single sample of the wonderful sites along this trail

This is a single sample of the wonderful sites along this trail

We did not stay in a camp but found two bed & breakfast to satisfy me.   Two nights at the camp ground on Prince Edward Island was enough for this trip.  We stayed our first night in Inverness.  The B&B was adjacent to the #2 Links Golf course in Canada.  It was beautiful, on the ocean (like St Andrews in Scotland) and expensive.

We did not stay in a camp but found two bed & breakfast to satisfy me. Two nights at the camp ground on Prince Edward Island was enough for this trip. We stayed our first night in Inverness. The B&B was adjacent to the #2 Links Golf course in Canada. It was beautiful, on the ocean (like St Andrews in Scotland) and expensive.

A view of the golf course from our B&B.  The host was rude and condescending...guess he doesn't like us Americans.  This is the first time I have ever encountered this.  I know a lot of people in other countries (I'm told) don't like us, but I assumed Canada was our "friend".  This guy wasn't one of our fans.

A view of the golf course from our B&B. The host was rude and condescending…guess he doesn’t like us Americans. This is the first time I have ever encountered this. I know a lot of people in other countries (I’m told) don’t like us, but I assumed Canada was our “friend”. This guy wasn’t one of our fans.

This is the last picture for this post.  St. Ann's Beach

This is the last picture for this post. St. Ann’s Beach